The age of individual skiers was not provided in the PDF results for many years, so for the summaries involving ages, a  gross-scale mean age  was calculated based on the age-group classification of each skier.  The mean age over both genders and both techniques has not changed much, from 41.3 in 1999 to 44 in 2016. The mean age of men has increased fairly steadily over the years while that of women has remained steady or slightly declined in recent years.   On average, classic skiers are about 2.4 years older than freestyle skiers, and women are about 5.1 years younger than men.  Further age breakdown:  Classic - female = 41.6  Classic - male = 47.9  Freestyle - female = 38.7  Freestyle - male = 43.6

The age of individual skiers was not provided in the PDF results for many years, so for the summaries involving ages, a gross-scale mean age was calculated based on the age-group classification of each skier.

The mean age over both genders and both techniques has not changed much, from 41.3 in 1999 to 44 in 2016. The mean age of men has increased fairly steadily over the years while that of women has remained steady or slightly declined in recent years. 

On average, classic skiers are about 2.4 years older than freestyle skiers, and women are about 5.1 years younger than men.

Further age breakdown:

Classic - female = 41.6

Classic - male = 47.9

Freestyle - female = 38.7

Freestyle - male = 43.6

 The largest age groups for men are 45-49 for freestyle and 50-54 for classic. The picture is very different and a little more complicated for women. The youngest age group, 18-24, is actually the largest age group for freestyle and the numbers in each successive age group decrease slightly until 35-39. A second peak occurs at 45-49. The overall trend for classic is similar but the largest age group is 50-54.       Age-group distributions are strikingly different for men and women,  and these differences have changed over time, as can be seen in the following figures.

The largest age groups for men are 45-49 for freestyle and 50-54 for classic. The picture is very different and a little more complicated for women. The youngest age group, 18-24, is actually the largest age group for freestyle and the numbers in each successive age group decrease slightly until 35-39. A second peak occurs at 45-49. The overall trend for classic is similar but the largest age group is 50-54. 

Age-group distributions are strikingly different for men and women, and these differences have changed over time, as can be seen in the following figures.

 In the first 8-year period from 1999 to 2008, the freestyle race was a great deal more popular than the classic race for both men and women. Few women entered the classic race.

In the first 8-year period from 1999 to 2008, the freestyle race was a great deal more popular than the classic race for both men and women. Few women entered the classic race.

 In the most recent 8-year period from 2009, the classic race attracted more skiers than in the earlier period for both men and women. The was also a marked increase in younger women doing either event. The largest age group for women was the 18-24 group for both the classic and freestyle events.  All things considered,  the separate classic trail in 2008 and renewed interest in classic skiing has been very good for the Birkie.

In the most recent 8-year period from 2009, the classic race attracted more skiers than in the earlier period for both men and women. The was also a marked increase in younger women doing either event. The largest age group for women was the 18-24 group for both the classic and freestyle events.

All things considered, the separate classic trail in 2008 and renewed interest in classic skiing has been very good for the Birkie.

   While the average age of Birkie skiers has not changed much over 16 years, the distribution among age groups has changed dramatically.     There are far more skiers in the upper and lower age groups in 2016 than there were in 1999. This may be a very positive demographic trend for the future – a steady stream of new, young skiers, and an evermore fit and dedicated group of older skiers.  It may also be that the same group of skiers in their early 40s who were so prominent in 1999 have continued doing the Birkie. Their prominence is now, 18 years later, reflected in the older age groups.

While the average age of Birkie skiers has not changed much over 16 years, the distribution among age groups has changed dramatically.

There are far more skiers in the upper and lower age groups in 2016 than there were in 1999. This may be a very positive demographic trend for the future – a steady stream of new, young skiers, and an evermore fit and dedicated group of older skiers.

It may also be that the same group of skiers in their early 40s who were so prominent in 1999 have continued doing the Birkie. Their prominence is now, 18 years later, reflected in the older age groups.

 In this graph, the number of younger (<30 year old) and older (50+ year old) skiers are compared over years for the classic race. It is apparent that there has been a dramatic increase in older men, and this increase has been going on for the last 16 races.  There is also an increase in younger and older women as well as younger men, but not nearly to the degree seen for older men. 

In this graph, the number of younger (<30 year old) and older (50+ year old) skiers are compared over years for the classic race. It is apparent that there has been a dramatic increase in older men, and this increase has been going on for the last 16 races.

There is also an increase in younger and older women as well as younger men, but not nearly to the degree seen for older men. 

 As seen for the classic race, the number of older men in the freestyle race has increased over years, but at a pace not much higher than for younger and older women and younger men.  Combined with the previous graph,&nbsp;it appears that   older men are becoming more and more prominent in the Birkie, especially the classic race .

As seen for the classic race, the number of older men in the freestyle race has increased over years, but at a pace not much higher than for younger and older women and younger men.

Combined with the previous graph, it appears that older men are becoming more and more prominent in the Birkie, especially the classic race.

 Each point in this figure depicts the difference in mean finish times between women and men for each year from 1999 to 2016 for the classic and freestyle events. All skiers are included.  The trendlines are pitched slightly downward suggesting that women are speeding up and/or men are slowing down such that the difference between genders is decreasing at a rate of 37 sec/year for freestyle and 12 sec/year for classic. These rates, however, are small enough, especially for the classic event, that they are essentially meaningless statistically.       Note: Finish times are standardized to a 55k classical race or a 51k freestyle race.

Each point in this figure depicts the difference in mean finish times between women and men for each year from 1999 to 2016 for the classic and freestyle events. All skiers are included.

The trendlines are pitched slightly downward suggesting that women are speeding up and/or men are slowing down such that the difference between genders is decreasing at a rate of 37 sec/year for freestyle and 12 sec/year for classic. These rates, however, are small enough, especially for the classic event, that they are essentially meaningless statistically.

 

Note: Finish times are standardized to a 55k classical race or a 51k freestyle race.

 This figure also represents the difference between women's and men's finish times, as in the previous figure, but the difference is presented only for the top 3 finishers in each age group.&nbsp;  It is obvious that a there has been a substantial narrowing of finish times for the classic race - 3 min 33 sec/year. This may be the result of a growing number of well-trained younger women skiers entering the classic event particularly after 2008 when the new classic trail was established.  While the freestyle trend line also sloped downward, the rate was statistically insignificant.       Note: Finish times are standardized to a 55k classical race or a 51k freestyle race.

This figure also represents the difference between women's and men's finish times, as in the previous figure, but the difference is presented only for the top 3 finishers in each age group. 

It is obvious that a there has been a substantial narrowing of finish times for the classic race - 3 min 33 sec/year. This may be the result of a growing number of well-trained younger women skiers entering the classic event particularly after 2008 when the new classic trail was established.

While the freestyle trend line also sloped downward, the rate was statistically insignificant.

 

Note: Finish times are standardized to a 55k classical race or a 51k freestyle race.